Is Your Low Energy Caused By Anemia?

Posted on July 8, 2014

Do you often feel too tired to do ANYTHING some days, even right after you get out of bed? You may be anemic.

Making changes in your diet can dramatically improve your energy!

While there are many reasons you may suffer a lack of energy, anemia is pretty suspect as our 21st century diets have changed toward foods lower in the nutrients our ancestors enjoyed. One way our bodies are energized is through the oxygen our red blood cells transports throughout the body. Anemia is a condition of deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin to do the job.

Blood tests can pin down whether anemia is a health issue for you, and in severe cases medical intervention is necessary. There is plenty you can you do yourself. Even without blood tests, making simple changes in your diet and lifestyle can both identify and remedy the problem by kick starting that much needed energy boost! Let’s look at some ways my clients have enjoyed increased energy and wellbeing that you can easily incorporate as well.

Increase Iron
Iron helps your bone marrow make hemoglobin, the molecule in the red blood cell that carries that oxygen. Women, prone to iron deficiency due to regular menstrual blood loss, require constant replenishing of iron. To increase iron through diet, consider adding some of these sources to your meals:

red meats (beef, pork, especially organic/grass fed liver)

poultry (especially dark meat and organic/grass fed chicken liver)

wild caught fish (salmon, halibut, perch, sardines), shellfish (clams, mussels, oysters)

nuts

egg yolks (organic and pasture raised most nutrient dense)

pumpkin seeds (pepitos)

dark leafy greens, such as kale, red romaine, spinach, collards, swiss chard, beet greens

non-leafy vegetables: sweet potatoes, peas, broccoli, green beans

prune juice

dried fruits (apricots, prunes, raisins, figs)

fresh fruits (strawberries, watermelon, figs)

legumes (red beans, peas, baked beans, lentils, chickpeas/hummus)

fortified grains/cereals

Curb Caffeine and other inhibitors
Coffee, tea, and red wine inhibit the body’s ability to absorb iron and folic acid.

Capture C
Along with a host of other great health benefits, vitamin C is an essential factor in the absorption of iron. Consume vitamin C and Iron rich foods together for your greatest energy boost. Foods rich in Vitamin C include:

peppers (red, orange, yellow, and green)

guavas

dark leafy greens, such as kale, red romaine, spinach, collards, swiss chard, beet greens

kiwi (green and gold both)

cruciferous veggies (broccoli. brussels sprouts, cauliflower, red cabbage)

berries (strawberries, raspberries and blackberries are the highest)

citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, grapefruit)

tomatoes

peas (green-fresh or frozen, sugar snap)

tropical fruits (papaya, mango, pineapple, cantaloupe)

Boost B12
Healthy red blood cells require Vitamin B12 to divide normally at the right size to exit the bone marrow tissue where they are created into the circulatory system. Great sources of B12 are:

red meats (beef, pork, especially organic/grass fed liver, paté, liverwurst)

poultry (especially dark meat and organic/grass fed chicken liver)

wild caught fish (salmon, halibut, perch, sardines), shellfish (clams, mussels, oysters)

crustaceans (crab, shrimp, lobster)

egg yolks (organic and pasture raised most nutrient dense)

fortified grains/cereals

dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt – go for nutrient rich organic pasture raised if possible)

Fancy Folate
Folic acid, a B vitamin is necessary to make and maintain new cells – including red blood cells. Note: cooking destroys folic acid in fruits and vegetables, so be sure to enjoy those sources raw whenever possible. Good food sources include:

folic acid fortified grains/pastas

dark leafy greens, such as kale, red romaine, spinach, collards, swiss chard, beet greens

egg yolks (organic and pasture raised most nutrient dense)

beef and chicken liver (especially organic/grass fed)

legumes (red beans, peas, baked beans, lentils, chickpeas/hummus)

vegetables (spinach, beets brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, asparagus, sweet potatoes)

fruits (banana, oranges, peaches)

Helpful Herbs
Many herbs are known to increase iron without adverse affects iron supplements cause (constipation, stomach disorders, impaired Vitamin E absorption). Consider these herbs: Yellow Dock. Nettle, Dandelion Root, Burdock Root, Alfalfa, Gentian, or Spirulina.

Beyond The Diet
As mentioned earlier, there are other reasons besides diet that affect your energy, some of which may require medical intervention. If making dietary changes don’t noticeably increase your energy, it’s time to take additional steps toward your health. Contact me for a free 50 minute health consultation where we can look at other holistic aspects of improving your specific energy and health needs. Occasionally, supplements can enhance what diet alone cannot provide. In instances where diet or supplements are not effective, a medical condition may exist where a doctor’s support is recommended for support with medication, procedures, or even surgery to assist in healing your body’s function.

Note that plenty of these food sources provide more than one essential ingredient to increase your energy, so be sure to include these regularly in your meals and snacks. Be sure to ‘like’ my facebook page for updates on more healthful tips to improve your energy and reduce the stress in your life. Want more? Contact me for a free 50 minute health consultation to help you determine the best individualized approach for you in your health.

See you again soon for a new update!

Paula

– See more at: http://paula-roelands.healthcoach.integrativenutrition.com/blog/2014/07/is-your-low-energy-caused-by-anemia#sthash.iC3I8cJp.tTSXGDUf.dpuf

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